How To Write The Ultimate Leader Profile

One of the things your church website should include is a leader profile on each of your church leaders.

Think of this as a digital introduction to your site’s visitors. These are potential new members and they want to learn a little about you before visiting your church.

However, your leadership profile has to be engaging, yet friendly. Take your time when writing it and it could be what sways someone to try your church this weekend.

Why It Matters?

Before the Internet, people just had to take a chance on a church via word of mouth alone. Naturally, your members probably already love your leadership style, but that doesn’t mean everyone will. Now, your leader profile is like having a brief conversation with interested new visitors. They get a sense of who you are, what your leadership style is like and also what your church might be like.

Without it, your church might still seem like a mystery. Between a great profile and engaging blog content, you create a clear picture of what attending your church would be like.

Add In Some Personality

Church leaders aren’t all the same. Just like with any other person, they have unique personalities. After all, if every church leader and pastor were exactly the same, every church would be identical too. Different churches, leaders and pastors appeal to a wider variety of people.

Your leader profile should showcase your personality. A bland checklist just makes your church seem dull and boring. Your personality helps define how you minister to others. Everyone looking for a church has different needs. Showing your unique personality helps show people how you could best meet those needs.

Express What’s Most Important

Why did you decide to become a church leader? Outside of following God’s calling, what made you not just follow God’s calling, but stick with it? Go ahead and share your passion. Share a quick story about yourself. The idea is to start building a relationship with website visitors by creating a common bond. Maybe someone had a similar experience or passion. That helps them better relate, keeps them on your site longer and may eventually lead them through your front doors.

Avoid Personal Opinions

Church leaders always have to be careful about expressing their personal opinions, especially highly controversial ones. Mistakes like this are most common on social media where a leader might post something rash while angry or get into politics. While it’s fine to showcase your personality, try to keep personal opinions to yourself.

Sound Welcoming

Your leader profile should come off as welcoming. Adding a natural picture of you doing something at church or a community event is much more welcoming than just a standard head shot. Use a friendly tone throughout your profile. While some use the third person, such as “Bob Bradley is proud to be a leader in New Hope Church,” it’s much better to use first person, such as “I love being a part of the supportive community at New Hope Church.”

Match The Tone Of The Church

A common mistake churches make is not having a consistent tone for all content, including leadership profiles. Your profile should match the tone of the church. Of course, the tone you use on your website and social media should match what it’s actually like inside your church’s walls. Take the time to determine the tone and ensure your profile doesn’t stand out like a sore thumb.

List Experiences And Qualifications

Naturally, you should also list why you’re qualified to be a church leader. After all, your website visitors want to know they’re going to be around leaders who are not only qualified to lead, but to teach others to lead as well. Take the time to list some of your accomplishments and strongest skill areas. You could even ask some of your volunteers to say why they like working with you.

Don’t have a leader profile yet? Create your church website to showcase all of your leaders and help visitors get to know you before they ever come in.

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